Science

Dental and chronological age in children under oncological treatment.

So one can argue that this is a very small, very specific population studied in this paper.  Thankfully, the number of cases of children undergoing cancer therapies such as this is small, and therefore the need to age them for forensic purposes is likely to be incredibly rare. However, the main piece around this research, published in the Journal of Forensic Science, more...

Analysis of human dentition from Early Bronze Age: 4000-year-old puzzle.

This paper presents the first ever paleodontological investigation of human remains from an archeological site in Central Europe dating from the Early Bronze Age and attributed to the Strzyzow Culture. It corroborates the knowledge gained from archeological, anthropological and genetical investigations. Our study aimed to assess dental status, dental morphology and dental more...

Dental age assessment in 7-14-year-old Chinese children: comparison of Demirjian and Willems methods.

Several approaches have proven be valuable in estimating dental age in children. The Demirjian method, based on crown and root calcification, is the most frequently used tool. The Willems method is a modification of the Demirjian method. There are few studies regarding to compare the application of the two methods in China. This study aims to apply the two methods in a more...

Arch width changes from 6 weeks to 45 years of age – Full Text

This is an important reference paper that should be consulted by anyone who is asked about the size of bitemarks and their relation to the age of the suspected biter.  While the data are from orthodontic studies the paper is especially strong as it a longitudinal study - i.e. the authors have followed the development of the dentition overtime.  As such the evidence is more...

Uniqueness of human dentition not proven

A new publication has found that the uniqueness of the human dentition remains unproven.   more...

Stats again inappropriately applied in odontology

The product rule has been applied in odontology again, after years of research suggests that it shouldn't be. more...

Its not only pattern analysis that can be fallible – how about DNA?

Fallible DNA evidence can mean prison or freedom YOU are the juror: would you trust DNA evidence? Most people regard it as near infallible- it produces the right result or no result, exonerating the innocent and securing convictions where other evidence fails. But DNA is not as objective as you might think. In the first of a two-part investigation, New Scientist reveals more...

Fingerprint enquiry completed

The report and recommendations of the Fingerprint Inquiry in the case of Shirley McKie has finally emerged. The report will join the very few that will have international and important repercussions for forensic practice. The NAS report criticised some elements of fingerprint analysis and bitemark analysis and therefore there is an interest from more...

Home office chief science adviser defends his role

From Research Research Bernard Silverman, chief scientific adviser to the Home Office, has rebutted concerns over his effectiveness following the revelation that he had no input in the decision to close the Forensic Science Service. At a House of Commons Home Affairs Select Committee hearing on 5 July, Liberal Democrat MP Julian Huppert said he was worried that more...

Silverman Review Published: Research and Development in Forensic Science

This review was conducted by Professor Silverman examining aspects of R&D within forensic science. You can download the full report here, but some of the key recommendations are provided below. Many of these recommendations make perfect sense, although it is hard to see where the finances will be found?  The funding councils are already reducing their commitments more...