DNA

UK Supreme Court recommends Jury Primers

The head of the UK Supreme Court has recommended Jury primers for forensic science in a piece called "Stop needless dispute of science in the courts" published in Nature this week. We have described the use of the Jury primers before - they present a means of showing the trier of fact the scope, and limitations of a science.  This helps jurys and keeps forensic more...

Prade wins right to another hearing over DNA findings

Former Akron Police Captain Douglas Prade has won another round of court hearings on DNA evidence in his bid for a new trial in the 1997 shooting death of his ex-wife. It marks the second time in three years that an evidentiary hearing will be held to examine bite-mark evidence on Dr. Margo Prade’s lab coat. The notorious case has received nationwide investigative more...

Authorities want innocence certificate vacated in case of man cleared by DNA

In the years since DNA pointed toward Bennie Starks' innocence in the rape and beating of a woman in Waukegan, Lake County authorities have worked persistently but unsuccessfully to continue holding him accountable for the attack. more...

Stats again inappropriately applied in odontology

The product rule has been applied in odontology again, after years of research suggests that it shouldn't be. more...

A new forensics bill approved in California

This article is by Radely Balko - original here California’s state Senate has just approved an important new bill that would help people convicted of crimes due to bad science win new trials. Let’s hope it gets passed into law. One of the most important things we’ve learned from DNA testing is that we have badly misjudged the reliability of a number of methods more...

Its not only pattern analysis that can be fallible – how about DNA?

Fallible DNA evidence can mean prison or freedom YOU are the juror: would you trust DNA evidence? Most people regard it as near infallible- it produces the right result or no result, exonerating the innocent and securing convictions where other evidence fails. But DNA is not as objective as you might think. In the first of a two-part investigation, New Scientist reveals more...